Mexican Chicken Noodle Soup

All the soups!

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Mexican Chicken Noodle Soup

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 white onion, diced
  • 1/4 cup celery, diced
  • 1/2 cup carrot, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 jalapeño, diced
  • 1 large chicken breast
  • 32 oz chicken stock
  • 1 14 oz can roasted tomatoes
  • 1 cup angel hair pasta broken into small pieces
  • 1/4 tsp coriander
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric
  • a few pinches of salt, to taste
  • 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • a little cilantro

Heat the olive oil over medium heat and add the onion, carrot and celery.

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Cook until the onion becomes translucent.  Add the garlic and jalapeño and cook for another minute.

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Dump in the roasted tomatoes, chicken stock, and chicken breast and bring it to a boil.

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When the chicken is cooked through, lower the heat to low, remove the chicken and shred it.

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Beef Stew

It’s winter so it’s like law of the land that us humans must consume beef stew.  Plus it’s actually cold here in Austin, it’s kind of freaky.  The Cayenne pepper and the brown sugar here make it sweetly spicy and awesomeeee.  You could also add turnips orrrr mushrooms ’cause that’d be dandy.

Beef Stew (fo four)

  • 1 lb stewing beef
  • olive oil (at least 2 tbsp)
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 yellow onion, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp tomato paste
  • 1 1/2 cups beef broth
  • a few shakes of Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp all-spice
  • 1 tsp brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp white sugar
  • 1 tsp Cayenne pepper (or less if you don’t like it a little spicy)
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • kosher salt
  • ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • some red potatoes
  • 3 carrots, peeled and cut into a dice
  • 3 ribs celery, diced
  • 1 tbsp cornstarch
  • 2 tbsp water

Smother your beef with salt and pepper.  Heat the oil over medium-high heat.  Then add the butter and once it’s melted (careful not to brown it) start browning the beef in batches.

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Keep going…

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Spicy Shrimp and Sausage Gumbo

I’ve never made any Cajun or Creole food, so I figured it was about time to experiment.  This is a Cajun-style recipe because the base of the gumbo is a dark roux and the aromatics are the trinity of onion, green pepper and celery.  This recipe is based off the “Spicy Seafood Gumbo” from Emily Ansara Baines’s “The Unofficial Hunger Games Cookbook,” although I added sausage, forgot to buy celery and the store didn’t have any okra.  Okra is an awesome vegetable, you should add some if you have it.  But anyways, this is a pretty easy and turned out pretty delicious. DSC_0298 Spicy Shrimp and Sausage Gumbo

  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 white onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 green onions, sliced
  • 2 sticks celery, diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 cup clam juice
  • 2 tbsp seafood seasoning, I used some crab/shrimp/crawfish boil seasoning I found at the grocery store
  • 2 tbsp Louisiana-style hot sauce
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper (less if you want less spice)
  • 2 lb shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1 sausage of your choosing, I used boudin sausage made of pork and pork liver
  • 1 box of rice, I used Zatarain’s brand Dirty Rice Mix

Start by boiling water for the rice and prepare per the box directions. Heat the butter in a heavy skillet over medium heat.  Take a wild guess at what I used… DSC_0284 THE DUTCH OVEN DUH. When the butter is melted, add the flour and stir with a fork or whisk.  I have this super nifty flat whisk and it rules at making a roux.  It’ll initially foam up a bunch like this: DSC_0285 So the tricky part about making a roux is that it’s so easy to burn it’s insane.  When you’re doing this part, make SURE you’re constantly stirring and watching it.  I stopped for 10 seconds to take a picture and ruined my first attempt; had the whole house smelling like burnt popcorn and you DON’T want that in your food, it’ll taste naaaasty. Just keep stirring.  Slowly it’ll start to get golden. DSC_0288 And it’ll get a little brownish… DSC_0290 Keep stirring constantly, you want your roux to be as dark as possible without having any burnt bits. DSC_0291 Keep going until it’s EVEN MORE brown.  DO NOT STOP STIRRING seriously it’s not fun to stir that long and burn it. DSC_0293 Continue reading

Chicken Stock

Congratulations!  You’ve butchered your first whole chicken!  Now what do you do with that carcass, those wings and wing tips?  Why, make chicken stock, of course!

Chicken Stock

  • chicken parts!  (carcass, wings and wing tips left over from THIS post)
  • 4 carrots, roughly cut into segments
  • 3 stalks of celery, roughly cut (tops and greens are good too!)
  • 1 onion, quartered
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 clump parsley (I used a combo of remnants of fresh Italian and dry since our local store was out of parsley?!)
  • some sprigs of thyme
  • water

In a large stock pot, throw in all of the ingredients.

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Fill with water.

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Bring to a boil, then immediately reduce to low.  Let that pot sit over a low heat uncovered for houuuuuurs aka sit on your butt and watch TV like I did.  Orange is the New Black, y’all.

Stir occasionally and wait for the house to smell like Thanksgiving.

I let mine go for about 3 hours, but it’s completely up to you.  I didn’t add any salt since you can always add that when you’re using the stock in a dish.

Strain it.

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Dump it into a plastic bag or some jars and freeze away for future dishes!

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Lobstah Staahk (Lobster Stock)

Look at all these beautiful discarded lobster parts from our Memorial day boil!

Lobsterz for daaaayz

Lobsterz for daaaayz

Now that you’ve boiled, cracked and dissected your shellfish friends, it’s time to use those shells and bodies to make stock!  Use it as a base for lobster bisque, lobster risotto, or straight up drink it.  The possibilities are limitless!

Lobstah Staahk
(based loosely off this recipe:  http://fishcooking.about.com/od/soupsstewsstocks/r/lobster_stock.htm)

Ingredients:

  • 2-4 lobster carcasses and shells, cleaned (remove the gills and eye sack because it’s sandy and gross)
  • olive oil
  • 1-2 onions, roughly chopped
  • a few cloves of garlic, minced
  • 4-6 celery stalks, roughly chopped
  • the tops of one fennel bulb, roughly chopped
  • 2-3 carrots, chopped
  • handful of mushrooms (any variety), sliced
  • 1/2 cup dry sherry
  • handful of parsley, chopped (I used dry because I forgot to buy fresh, but fresh is always better!)
  • a few bay leaves
  • salt
  • water

In a large pot, heat a few tablespoons of olive oil at medium heat and add the onions, celery and carrots, cooking them for about 3-4 minutes until they soften up a little.  Then add the lobster shells and cook for another few minutes before adding the garlic, fennel, and mushrooms.  Cook all this goodness together a few more minutes and add the herbs (parsley and bay leaves) and the sherry.  Let the sherry cook down until the alcohol burns off, you’ll be able to tell mostly by smell, but give it a taste.

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